Donate

Bay Area

DA Signs Off on Suicide Findings in 2 Deaths Tied to OPD Sexual Exploitation

Review includes the shooting deaths of Irma Huerta-Lopez in 2014 and that of her husband, Oakland Officer Brendan O'Brien, a year later.

When Yahoo! Was King: Scenes From the Bubble

After a torturously slow decline, Yahoo is done. But once upon a time, it was a Web colossus that almost made me rich.

Marni Nixon, Voice of Classic Movie Songs, Has Died at 86

Singer was heard, but not seen, in leading roles in "My Fair Lady," "The King and I," "West Side Story" and other film musicals.

Pandemonium as Sanders Supporters Boo Politicos at DNC Breakfast

Supporters of Bernie Sanders booed and heckled nearly every speaker at the mention of the Clinton-Kaine ticket at California's delegate breakfast on Monday.

Recently on KQED Public Radio

Forum With Michael Krasny

Experiences of Bay Area Day Laborers Come Alive in 'Voices of the Undocumented'

It's hard to miss the day laborers lined up on street corners across the Bay Area. But these workers' diverse personal histories are not so obvious. "Voices of the Undocumented" by two volunteers at the Day Worker Center of Mountain View records the stories of nine Bay Area day laborers. We'll discuss the book and hear from one of the workers highlighted in its pages.

Forum on the Road: Winery Development in Sonoma County

The number of Sonoma County wineries has more than doubled since 2005 and the industry is the backbone of the region's economy. But some neighborhood groups say escalating winery tourism from tasting rooms and events brings unwanted traffic and noise and threatens their rural quality of life. In response, county supervisors and planning officials are working to establish new guidelines for winery events. We'll talk with industry experts, community activists and local officials about the high stakes of winery development in Sonoma County.

'Resilient San Francisco' Plan Details City Response to Emergency

San Francisco city officials released a comprehensive disaster plan on the 110th anniversary of the 1906 earthquake. The report, "Resilient San Francisco: Stronger Today, Stronger Tomorrow," builds on a year-long collaboration among almost 100 organizations and details how the city will respond to a major disaster. We'll get the details from the city's Chief Resilience Officer, Patrick Otellini.

San Francisco Proposes Bailout for Over-Budget Transit Center

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee announced a proposal last week to provide $260 million in interim financing for the completion of the first phase of the Transbay Transit Center. The bailout deal followed the ouster of the Transit Center's executive director, who critics charge allowed years of construction delays and cost overruns. We discuss the future of the $2.4 billion project.

The California Report

Legal Organizations Sue County Courts Over Traffic Fine Repercussions

More than 500,000 Californians had their drivers licenses suspended because the are too poor to pay their traffic fines, according to the ACLU. Now, a coalition of legal organizations plans to sue county courts that do this in the hopes of changing statewide policy. On Wednesday, they filed a suit in Northern California against Solano County's Superior Court.

SFMOMA Reopens, Brings Back Modern Art to the Bay Area

Los Angeles has been where the action is for new and expanded museums the past few years. But tomorrow, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art reopens after a three year closure for renovations. It's about to unveil a huge new wing and more gallery space than any modern art museum in the country. We talk with KQED art reporter Cy Musiker, who has seen the new galleries and a lot of new art.

President Obama Grants Disaster Relief in Wake of Napa Quake

President Barack Obama has declared last month's South Napa Earthquake a major disaster. The declaration frees up emergency federal dollars for California. The White House didn't say how much, but Gov. Brown's office has identified an estimated $87 million worth of costs that could be reimbursed. Federal funds will go to reimburse state and local governments and non-profits for emergency work, and repairs and replacement of public facilities.

Recycled Wastewater Program Keeps East Bay Gardens Alive

As the drought wears on, Californians are looking for new ways to conserve water. In the hot suburbs east of San Francisco, one water district is giving away treated sewage water for landscaping. It's the first program of its kind in the nation.