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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, November 22, 2014

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, November 22, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Pipeline Opposition on Multiple Fronts in South Dakota The U.S. Senate failed to approve the Keystone XL pipeline -- but the issue appears headed for a green light in the GOP-controlled Congress next year. A group of Native Americans occupying a part of the proposed pipeline route in South Dakota say they're not moving. They've joined forces with local landowners who oppose the use of eminent domain for the pipeline project.
  • 1:00 am
    KQED Newsroom UC President on University-Wide Tuition Hike Hours after the University of California Board of Regents voted 14-7 to raise tuition, UC President Janet Napolitano told KQED that she hopes the increase never happens. Napolitano said the 5 percent per year increase over five years is "a ceiling" that can be significantly reduced if the state steps up and increases funding for the university.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week Analyzing Obama's Immigration Reform Action President Obama's executive action to overhaul the nation's immigration enforcement system will allow as many as 5 million undocumented immigrants to stay in the country without threat of deportation. The plan will also expand the current "Dreamers" program that protects immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children, but the new policy will not shield the parents of those Dreamers. Republicans are adamantly opposed to the president's plan and his decision to bypass Congress. Incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is vowing to undo the president's action when Republicans takeover Congress in January.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Love it or hate it, fracking is changing the way America powers its economy. Thanks to fracking, the United States is now the world's largest petroleum producer, something unthinkable a few years ago. Coal is down, but not out. Nuclear's knees are buckling due to low natural gas prices and the fallout from Fukushima. Researchers and investors are looking for big breakthroughs in storage technology and sucking carbon out of smokestacks. In Silicon Valley, the buzz is about the Internet of Things and merging information technology with energy. Previous attempts to marry those two didn't end well. Is this time different? What are the promising areas for innovation and creating new jobs and economic growth? What role should the U.S. government play in discovering new fuels and getting them to market? The show presents a wide-ranging conversation with U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe How Much Longer Will Sweden Welcome Middle Eastern Refugees? Sweden has established itself as the most generous European nation when it comes to accepting refugees from the conflicts in Iraq and Syria. It is unique in that it has guaranteed asylum to those who reach its borders. As a result, Sweden is now accepting record numbers. But the leader of one of the most significant refugee groups has urged the Stockholm government to end its open door policy. He claims the problems facing immigrants are too immense, such as housing and unemployment.
  • 4:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) In Pursuit of Prosperity In this age of globalization, it's clear that America's prosperity and security depends on that of our political and economic partners. But today we see mounting evidence that our partners' stability is threatened by global environmental change. Increasing pressure on limited resources is disrupting global supply chains, causing social instability, destabilizing regional relations and expanding illegal trade. A group of top policy leaders and security experts joins the show to discuss why environmental sustainability must become a central tenet of U.S. foreign policy in order to protect our national security and promote global prosperity. Panelists include Richard L. Engel, director, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Strategic Futures Group, National Intelligence Council; Amy Luers, director of Climate Change, Skoll Global Threats Fund; and David Reed, senior vice president of policy, World Wildlife Fund.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    The Best of Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life 129 Cars The show spends a month at a Jeep dealership on Long Island as they try to make their monthly sales goal: 129 cars. If they make it, they'll get a huge bonus from the manufacturer, possibly as high as $85,000 -- enough to put them in the black for the month. If they don't make it, it'll be the second month in a row. So they pull out all the stops.
  • 1:00 pm
    Radiolab Emergence What happens when there is no leader? Starlings, bees and ants manage just fine. In fact, they form staggeringly complicated societies -- all without a Toscanini to conduct them into harmony. The show finds out how this happens, and gazes down at the bottom-up logic of cities, Google, and even our very own brains with fire-flyologists, ant experts, neurologists, a mathematician and an economist.
  • 2:00 pm
    Radio Specials Hidden Kitchens with host Frances McDormand The Raw and the Cooked -- The show takes an hour-long journey into the world of clandestine cooking, kitchen rituals and traditions. Hosted by Academy Award-winning actress Frances McDormand, the program features tales of kitchens that suddenly pop up, kitchens that stay underground to survive, kitchens that are the keepers of a culture and cooking traditions that spring from the most unlikely moments of history.
  • 3:00 pm
    Moyers & Company How Public Power Can Defeat Plutocrats Government has become a clearinghouse for corporations and plutocrats with deep pockets to buy the politicians who grease the wheels for lucrative contracts and easy regulation. It's all pay for play, and look the other way. According to the watchdog Sunlight Foundation, from 2007 to 2012, 200 corporations spent almost $6 billion in Washington on lobbying and campaign contributions. And they received more than $4 trillion in government contracts and other forms of assistance. Now that the midterm elections are over, it's payback time, with the newly elected Congress ready to deliver to those who invested well in their chosen candidates. This week, Lawrence Lessig and Zephyr Teachout return to talk about the corrupting influence of money in politics - a subject both have studied as scholars and are fighting against as reformers.
  • 3:30 pm
  • 4:00 pm
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion November in Manhattan The show broadcasts from The Town Hall on West 43rd Street in Manhattan, with vintage-pop singer Kat Edmonson, bandleader Vince Giordano, pianist and clarinetist Butch Thompson, trumpeter Jon-Erik Kellso and actress Kate Beahen.
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Queens and Babies Guest host Cynthia Nixon presents two stories about extreme love. In "Magic and Dread," an excerpt from Jenny Offill's novel "Dept. of Speculation," a new mother is exhausted and exhilarated. The reader is Kaneza Schaal. Broadway star BD Wong reads the story of the doomed love affair between a Trojan warrior and Dido, the Queen of Carthage, from Virgil's Aeneid.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life 129 Cars The show spends a month at a Jeep dealership on Long Island as they try to make their monthly sales goal: 129 cars. If they make it, they'll get a huge bonus from the manufacturer, possibly as high as $85,000 -- enough to put them in the black for the month. If they don't make it, it'll be the second month in a row. So they pull out all the stops.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour Chess, Romance and Kathmandu The first African-American chess grandmaster details his unorthodox education and the private chess match that defines him. A socialite trying to escape an unhappy marriage accidentally crashes the coronation of the king of Nepal. And an octogenarian makes a romantic connection with a man she worked with over a half a century before.
  • 11:00 pm
  • 12:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events.
Saturday, November 22, 2014

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