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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, May 24, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Brennan House Intel Former CIA Director John Brennan told a House panel on Thursday there was evidence of contact between Trump campaign aides and Russians, but that he didn't have enough information to determine whether they colluded.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Judy Collins Judy Collins is one of the reigning icons of folk music. Over her illustrious career, she has recorded more than fifty albums, including Wildflowers, Judith, and A Maid of Constant Sorrow. Known to her fans as Judy Blue Eyes, Collins has also written several books, including her 2012 memoir Sweet Judy Blue Eyes: My Life in Music, a highly evocative memoir highlighting the 60s, when hits like Both Sides Now catapulted her to international fame. Her forthcoming book Cravings: How I Conquered Food, is a deeply personal account of her tumultuous and fraught relationship with food and how her issues with overeating and addiction nearly claimed her career and her life. Judy Collins was in conversation with the host of KQED Forum, Michael Krasny, on March 9th.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Lasted From Manchester A suicide bomber attacked an arena in Manchester, England at the end of a pop concert. More than twenty people were killed, and more than fifty were injured. Some of the victims were children. Morning Edition will have the latest findings of investigators looking into the motives and possible terror connections.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:43am, 8:43am & 11:29pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Political News Roundup with NPR's Scott Horsley President Donald Trump's budget plan, unveiled on Tuesday, would make deep cuts to social programs while boosting military spending. How will the proposal fare on Capitol Hill? We check in with NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley on the budget, the president's trip abroad and other late-breaking political developments.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum The Trials of Marvin Mutch: 41 Years in Prison, Proclaiming Innocence In 1975, when he was 19 years old, Marvin Mutch was convicted of murder. He didnt leave prison until 41 years later. It took the efforts of students working on a wrongful conviction project and a series of lawyers to finally win his release. A new KQED News documentary, The Trials of Marvin Mutch, looks at the circumstantial evidence that landed Mutch behind bars, his life in prison and what his case reveals about the parole system. Co-producers and reporters Adam Grossberg and Alex Emslie join us to talk about the film and what Marvins life is like now that hes free.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Free Climber Tommy Caldwell on The Push In 2015, Tommy Caldwell and his climbing partner Kevin Jorgeson made history when they completed the first continuous free climb of the Dawn Wall face of El Capitan in Yosemite. Outside Magazine dubbed the granite face arguably the most difficult ascent in the history of rock climbing, and one reporter likened the feat to climbing plate glass. In his new memoir, The Push, Caldwell talks about growing up small and uncoordinated, how his dad helped shape him into an extreme athlete, and how he was once kidnapped by armed rebels.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Manchester Coverage Continues Eye witness accounts of the terrorist attack outside a Manchester stadium tell of panic among concert goers. Hear the latest on the investigation.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Montanas Health Care Gains With health care reform still up for debate in Washington D.C., the future of Montanas Medicaid expansion is unclear. 72,000 people gained access to health care after the expansion in 2015. Approximately 20,000 of that population are American Indians. Todd Zwillich interviewed health care providers and recipients across the state about how theyve been impacted by the expansion.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Aziz Ansari Aziz Ansari talks about co-writing and starring in the second season of his Netflix comedy series, Master of None. Among the things his character deals with this season are his decision to eat pork in front of his parents, who are Muslim immigrants from India.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Colorful Mumbai Taxis Passengers get a visual treat when they take a taxi in Mumbai, India. Inside, the ceilings are painted with bright colors, geometric patterns, and for some reason, lots of fruit.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace PayPals Evolution Back when PayPal first launched, making payments online was new and innovative. Now the company and its role in our lives, is evolving.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    NATO Allies Anxious -- The Trump administration has been trying to allay fears of the Baltic States and other newer NATO members that the U.S. remains committed to the military alliance. But officials are anxiously awaiting President Trump's visit to hear directly from him.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace PayPals Evolution Back when PayPal first launched, making payments online was new and innovative. Now the company and its role in our lives, is evolving.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Aziz Ansari Aziz Ansari talks about co-writing and starring in the second season of his Netflix comedy series, Master of None. Among the things his character deals with this season are his decision to eat pork in front of his parents, who are Muslim immigrants from India.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials The Computer History Museum Presents From Screen Queen to Imaging Innovator -- Mary Lou Jepsen has lead Facebooks virtual reality efforts, advised Googles Sergey Brin and invented $100 laptops. Now she is turning her consumer electronics experience to the task of curing disease. After decades of working in display divisions at some of Silicon Valleys biggest companies, her goal is to shrink todays massive MRI machines into wearable devices that continuously scan the body. Jepsens new company, OpnWatr.io, is developing technology that uses the way the body scatters infrared light to develop high resolution images equal to those produced by MRI. This is enabled by novel LCDs with pixels small enough to create holographic images, coupled with the use of body-temperature detectors and complex software. These LCDs are small and light enough that they could line a beanie or a bandage. The implications of a wearable body imaging system are significant for detecting and treating cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and even mental illnesses. Join us as Mary Lou Jepsen discusses her Silicon Valley history, her company on the cutting edge of tech and medicine and her vision for the future of body imaging and healthcare. Until mid-2016 she led advanced consumer electronics and virtual reality at Facebook and Oculus. Previously she had a similar role at Google and Google [x], where she was also a close advisor to Sergey Brin. She co-founded One Laptop per Child (OLPC) with Nicholas Negroponte, and was the lead inventor and architect of the $100 laptop. She holds a PhD in optical physics and an ScB in electrical engineering both from Brown University as well as an ScM in computational holography from the MIT Media Lab. She is an inventor on over 100 published or issued patents.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Free Climber Tommy Caldwell on The Push In 2015, Tommy Caldwell and his climbing partner Kevin Jorgeson made history when they completed the first continuous free climb of the Dawn Wall face of El Capitan in Yosemite. Outside Magazine dubbed the granite face arguably the most difficult ascent in the history of rock climbing, and one reporter likened the feat to climbing plate glass. In his new memoir, The Push, Caldwell talks about growing up small and uncoordinated, how his dad helped shape him into an extreme athlete, and how he was once kidnapped by armed rebels.
  • 11:00 pm
    1A with Joshua Johnson Battling Violent Extremism How do you stop an ideology? President Donald Trump says the world must confront extremists or, in his words, "drive them out." After the attack in Manchester, England, can we stop extreme ideologies, or do we need to rethink what's possible?
  • 12:00 am
Wednesday, May 24, 2017

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Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.

Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQED-FM, Sat 5/06-Sun 5/07: shift to auxiliary antenna

      KQED-FM is likely to be operating on its auxiliary transmit antenna this Saturday and possibly Sunday as well. There will be workers redoing the tower light wiring on the tower that supports the KQED-FM main antenna. They have asked to begin work at 6AM and work the whole day on Saturday and finish on Sunday […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.