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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, May 22, 2015

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, May 22, 2015
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Nail Salon Outreach New York City authorities Thursday launched a single "day of action" to educate nail salon operators, workers and customers about labor and immigration standards following a recent New York Times report on the widespread exploitation of undocumented immigrant workers in city salons.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials End of the Dial Radio Renaissance? -- Radio is dead. Or so we are told. Video was supposed to have killed the radio star. Is the Internet going to finish it off? International broadcasters are closing. Whole nations are dropping off the dial. But Garth Mullins isn't ready to pull the plug just yet. In an autobiographical rumination on a life with radio, Garth talks to Elizabeth Hay, Ira Glass, Ethan Zuckerman, Ryan McMahon and Stephen P. McGreevy. They reveal a radio renaissance. Podcasting is revolutionizing the airwaves. But don't let that old-school terrestrial radio disappear. When the grid goes down, it's the only thing left standing. We'll need radio to talk to each other, when the lights go out.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Humans Who Help When Algorithms Fail A lot of what we see online is managed by computers. But not everything. Often computers can't capture a lot of nuance. So some companies give them human assistants. The show looks into the anonymous humans who help computers, when algorithms can't quite get the job done.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
  • 8:00 am
  • 8:33 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Cleanup Underway in Santa Barbara Coast Oil Spill An underground pipeline that ruptured Tuesday has released at least 21,000 gallons of crude oil onto the beach and into the ocean along the Santa Barbara coast. The U.S. Coast Guard estimates the oil slicks stretch for nine miles. As cleanup efforts continue, we look at the environmental impacts of the spill, what may have caused it and what can be done to prevent future incidents.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Suicide Rate Nearly Doubles for Black Youth A new study reveals the suicide rate for black children has nearly doubled since the early 1990s, while the suicide rate for white children fell. The study, published in the national medical journal JAMA Pediatrics, looked at youth ages 5 to 11 from 1993 to 2012. We look at the possible reasons for the rise in suicides.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum David Kelley on How to Unlock Creative Confidence Growing up in Ohio, David Kelley was the type of kid who would take apart car engines and washing machines. Today, the founder of the design firm IDEO and Stanford's design school focuses on creative ways to fix problems, from upgrading the Apple mouse to solving traffic jams. He joins us to talk about the importance of cross-collaboration, his book "Creative Confidence" and how each person can unlock his or her own creativity.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday The Science of Seeds Why do we have 864,000 seeds stored under a Norwegian mountain? Host Ira Flatow and guests crack open the science of seeds. Plus, what the sun does to your skin its more than just sunburns.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday All the Ocean Organisms You Can't See One gulp of seawater contains about 200 million viruses. Yum. Ira Flatow and guests examine a new survey of all the ocean organisms you can't see. The show also talks with sci-fi writer Neal Stephenson about his new novel, "Seveneves."
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Maureen Corrigan on the Greatness of Gatsby Book critic Maureen Corrigan talks about the book she wrote, which is about the novel she loves more than any other. It's a novel she and many other critics consider the greatest American novel: "The Great Gatsby." In writing about Gatsby, she also writes about herself as a reader and teacher. Corrigan's book "So We Read On" has just been published in paperback.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Japanese-New Orleans Jazz Connection Marco Werman is in New Orleans checking out a little known musical connection between New Orleans jazz and musicians from Japan. It turns out Japanese jazz players have been going there for decades.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Challenges of Creating a More Diverse Police Force Twelve percent of police nationwide are African-American -- and that percentage hasn't gone up in more than a decade. The show looks at the costs and challenges of creating a more diverse police force in a series, "Behind the Blue Line."
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report Violence Causes Ripple Effects for Thousands of Oakland Students For the second part of our special series "Books and Bullets," we focus on those schools in Oakland where many students, if not most, have witnessed shootings and death. In some schools, three out of four students say they have lost a loved one. That can lead to depression, anxiety and PTSD, all of which make classwork tough. And teachers and counselors have the heartbreaking job of trying to heal these hidden wounds, while still providing an education.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report Violence Causes Ripple Effects for Thousands of Oakland Students For the second part of our special series "Books and Bullets," we focus on those schools in Oakland where many students, if not most, have witnessed shootings and death. In some schools, three out of four students say they have lost a loved one. That can lead to depression, anxiety and PTSD, all of which make classwork tough. And teachers and counselors have the heartbreaking job of trying to heal these hidden wounds, while still providing an education.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Maureen Corrigan on the Greatness of Gatsby Book critic Maureen Corrigan talks about the book she wrote, which is about the novel she loves more than any other. It's a novel she and many other critics consider the greatest American novel: "The Great Gatsby." In writing about Gatsby, she also writes about herself as a reader and teacher. Corrigan's book "So We Read On" has just been published in paperback.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club David Brooks How is character developed? In a society that emphasizes success and achievement, New York Times columnist David Brooks illustrates what humility, inner worth and moral depth really mean. Brooks' latest book is "The Road to Character."
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report Violence Causes Ripple Effects for Thousands of Oakland Students For the second part of our special series "Books and Bullets," we focus on those schools in Oakland where many students, if not most, have witnessed shootings and death. In some schools, three out of four students say they have lost a loved one. That can lead to depression, anxiety and PTSD, all of which make classwork tough. And teachers and counselors have the heartbreaking job of trying to heal these hidden wounds, while still providing an education.
  • 11:30 pm
  • 12:00 am
Friday, May 22, 2015

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