Donate

Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, March 24, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, March 24, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Objections to the ACHA The House is delaying a scheduled Thursday vote on the American Health Care Act. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks New Jersey Republican Rep. Leonard Lance about why he plans to vote against the bill.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Intelligence Squared U.S. Has Our "Special Relationship" with Saudi Arabia Outlived its Usefulness? -- Since 1945, the U.S. and Saudi Arabia have maintained a close relationship, with oil and military and intelligence cooperation at its foundation. But the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. shale revolution, human rights concerns, and diverging interests in the Middle East, have all put strains on this relationship. Has this special relationship outlived its usefulness?
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Whats Next for ACHA? The American Health Care Act is the bill the GOP has put forward as a way to replace President Obamas Affordable Care Act. A vote on it was delayed in the House of Representatives yesterday. Where does the debate over health care goes from here?
  • MORNING
  • 6:22 am
  • 8:00 am
  • 8:22 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum California Lawmakers Push for Reforms to Bail System Over 60 percent of people in California jails haven't been convicted of a crime, but are in custody awaiting trial. That's led some state lawmakers and civil rights advocacy groups to push for reforms to the state's bail bonds system. Those pushing for change say that people shouldn't be detained simply because they can't afford bail and that the state's exorbitant bail rates push low-income defendants to accept plea bargains. But bail agents and district attorneys argue that such reforms could destroy a system that ensures people show up for trial and saves taxpayers money. Meanwhile in Santa Clara County, law enforcement has been cracking down on illegal bail bonds operations, where longtime inmates use the promise of cheap bail to funnel incoming inmates to certain bail bonds companies. In this hour of Forum, we discuss the current state of California's bail system and debate potential reforms.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Writer Vanessa Hua Explores Immigrant Experiences with 'Deceit and Other Possibilities' A Hong Kong movie star forced to return home to Oakland after a sex scandal. A boy from Mexico reunited with his parents in San Francisco, only to find his family splitting apart. An obedient Korean-American daughter who failed to get into Stanford and fakes her way onto campus. These are the characters in Vanessa Hua's debut collection of short stories, "Deceit and Other Possibilities," which centers around the lies people tell themselves and others. The San Francisco Chronicle columnist joins us to talk about her fiction writing and breaking away from stereotypes of first- and second-generation immigrants.
  • 10:30 am
    Forum Larger Than Life: Tupac Shakur Enters Rock and Roll Hall of Fame The late rapper and actor Tupac Shakur will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April. Tupac recorded his best-known songs for Death Row Records in Los Angeles, but he spent some of his formative years in the Bay Area and continued to claim Oakland after he left the city because, as he put it, "that's where I got the game at." Tupac lived in a Marin City public housing complex known as The Jungle, attended Tamalpais High School and debuted as a rapper with the Oakland hip-hop group Digital Underground. Before his murder in 1996, Tupac had become one of hip-hop's most charismatic and controversial figures. His music addressed issues of inequality, police brutality and racism, but also espoused the gangster lifestyle and a personal code of ethics he called "thug life." In this hour we talk about Tupac's life and legacy, and his ties to the Bay Area.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday After Deepwater Seven years after the explosion of BPs Deepwater Horizon oil rig, a new play tells the story of the 11 men who lost their lives, and the ensuing ecological and human disaster. Join Ira Flatow on Science Friday to revisit the worst offshore oil spill in US history--and the Gulfs recovery since. Plus, new guidelines that could keep doctors-in-training on the job for up to 24 hours.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Desert Superbloom The deserts in superbloom - so whats it mean for wild bees? Join Ira Flatow for a look at wildflower blooms across the country what to hunt for, and how you can gather actual scientific data about what you spot. Plus, what baby carrots can teach us about infinity. Its math thats fun.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air American Eugenics The American eugenics movement that led to a 1927 Supreme Court decision and the forced sterilization of tens of thousands of Americans deemed physically or mentally unfit. Minorities, the poor, even promiscuous women were targeted. American eugenics also inspired the Nazis. Terry Gross talks with Adam Cohen, author of "Imbeciles."
  • 2:00 pm
    World The U-Visa A special visa that protects undocumented immigrants who are victims of crimes. They can get what's called a U-visa, if they report the crime and help authorities. But some fear for the U-visa program's future.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Beauty and the Beast Nine years after Disney approached David Hoberman and Todd Lieberman about making a live action version of Beauty and the Beast, the film is smashing records at the box office.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report Paying for Privatization, Musical Rediscovery As part of his plan for his first 100 days in office, President Donald Trump has proposed privatization as the best strategy for fixing up the countrys infrastructure -- things like pipes, roads and bridges. Well, in California, a number of communities have already privatized their drinking water systems. And for some small towns, that hasnt turned out so well for residents. Plus, have you ever created something, a piece of music, a drawing, a story -- and then forgotten about it -- only to have someone else -- find it years later and give it a new life? Hear the story of a gospel group from Fresno, whose 40-year-old recording has been rediscovered in a very big way.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:43am, 8:43am & 11:29pm

    UK Not Spying -- The United Kingdom government says claims by President Trump's spokesman, Sean Spicer, that Britain spied on the Trump campaign are ridiculous and should be ignored.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report Paying for Privatization, Musical Rediscovery As part of his plan for his first 100 days in office, President Donald Trump has proposed privatization as the best strategy for fixing up the countrys infrastructure -- things like pipes, roads and bridges. Well, in California, a number of communities have already privatized their drinking water systems. And for some small towns, that hasnt turned out so well for residents. Plus, have you ever created something, a piece of music, a drawing, a story -- and then forgotten about it -- only to have someone else -- find it years later and give it a new life? Hear the story of a gospel group from Fresno, whose 40-year-old recording has been rediscovered in a very big way.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air American Eugenics The American eugenics movement that led to a 1927 Supreme Court decision and the forced sterilization of tens of thousands of Americans deemed physically or mentally unfit. Minorities, the poor, even promiscuous women were targeted. American eugenics also inspired the Nazis. Terry Gross talks with Adam Cohen, author of "Imbeciles."
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Journalist Stephen Kinzer: Historys Lessons for American Foreign Policy in 2017 As President Trump takes office, how should the United States act in the world? Drawing on his latest book, Stephen Kinzer will transport us back to the early 20th century, when the United States first found itself with the chance to dominate faraway lands. That prospect thrilled some Americans. It horrified others. Their debate gripped the nation. The countrys best-known political and intellectual leaders took sides. Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Cabot Lodge, and William Randolph Hearst pushed for imperial expansion; Mark Twain, Booker T. Washington, and Andrew Carnegie preached restraint. Only once beforein the period when the United States was foundedhave so many brilliant Americans so eloquently debated a question so fraught with meaning for all humanity. Join Kinzer as he discusses these impassioned arguments and their great relevance to the world of 2017.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report Paying for Privatization, Musical Rediscovery As part of his plan for his first 100 days in office, President Donald Trump has proposed privatization as the best strategy for fixing up the countrys infrastructure -- things like pipes, roads and bridges. Well, in California, a number of communities have already privatized their drinking water systems. And for some small towns, that hasnt turned out so well for residents. Plus, have you ever created something, a piece of music, a drawing, a story -- and then forgotten about it -- only to have someone else -- find it years later and give it a new life? Hear the story of a gospel group from Fresno, whose 40-year-old recording has been rediscovered in a very big way.
  • 11:30 pm
  • 12:00 am
Friday, March 24, 2017

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.