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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Sunday, March 29, 2015

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, March 29, 2015
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab 3 Questions The show rides along on New York City's poop train to find out what happens to poop once it's, well, pooped. Then, Radiolab travels to Kenya where legions of athletes, sports gurus and scientists have tried to figure out why a specific tribe has long-dominated long-distance running. And lastly, why quicksand -- once a real fear -- no longer scares an 8-year-old.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Vaccine Wars Is there any evidence that vaccines cause autism? Any at all? If the answer is no, then why is anti-vaccination on the rise? Autism. Jenny McCarthy. Measles at Disneyland. How did we get here?
  • 3:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Lab Lit Science is moving out of the lab and into the pages of literary fiction. The show introduces the "Lab Lit" movement, and talks about why fiction needs more realistic portrayals of scientists and science culture.
  • 4:00 am
    Living On Earth What a Record-Low Snowpack Means for Summer in the Northwest Snow pack is important for summer life in the Northwest. In the winter, snow accumulates on mountaintops and as temperatures rise, snowmelt recharges water systems and generates hydropower throughout the region. This year, snow pack is at record low and many fear that the supply might not last through the entire summer.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 10:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events.
  • 11:00 am
    A Prairie Home Companion Drifting Down a Dusty Road The show features a rebroadcast from the Ted Constant Convocation Center in Norfolk, Virginia. Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver play "Blue Train (Of the Heartbreak Line)," and the U.S. Fleet Forces Band performs "The Klaxon."
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born in Nigeria. Her novel "Americanah" was awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award and was named one of The New York Times Ten Best Books of the year. Like Adichie, it straddles the cultures of America and Nigeria, considering the challenges, status, and perceptions of Africans abroad. Themes of race, displacement, power and class are combined with humor, popular culture and a gripping love story. Her previous books include the novels "Half of a Yellow Sun" and "Purple Hibiscus," and the story collection "The Thing Around Your Neck." The recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, Adichie was named one of the 20 most important fiction writers today under 40 years old by The New Yorker. She appeared in conversation with Dave Eggers on Sept. 30, 2014.
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
    Latino USA El Telefono Seventy-two percent of Latinos over 18 own smartphones - almost 10 percent more than the national average. The show tries to answer why Latinos use phones at higher rates and what mobile technology could mean for health, finances and democracy.
  • 4:00 pm
    Says You! The witty word trivia game from member station WGBH in Boston.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    KQED Newsroom The Future of Entertainment How do you keep audiences engaged and entertained in an era of shorter attention spans?
  • 6:30 pm
    Cambridge Forum Social Immobility, Civic Participation and the Health of Democracy Economist Randy Albelda examines the rise in U.S. social immobility and the role that contemporary labor conditions have played in limiting Americans expectations to do better than their parents' generation. Union organizer Joey Mokos responds by discussing the ways that the modern union movement is working to counteract this trend. How can organizing lead to improved personal and societal futures in a nation that prizes rugged individualism?
  • 7:00 pm
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Vaccine Wars Is there any evidence that vaccines cause autism? Any at all? If the answer is no, then why is anti-vaccination on the rise? Autism. Jenny McCarthy. Measles at Disneyland. How did we get here?
  • 8:00 pm
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Lab Lit Science is moving out of the lab and into the pages of literary fiction. The show introduces the "Lab Lit" movement, and talks about why fiction needs more realistic portrayals of scientists and science culture.
  • 9:00 pm
    Marketplace Weekend Surviving the Line Why is waiting in line so horrible? An expert on lines tells us how to make them less miserable.
  • 10:00 pm
    TED Radio Hour Press Play Does something serious happen when we play? TED speakers describe how all forms of amusement -- from tossing a ball to video games -- can make us smarter, saner and more collaborative.
  • 11:00 pm
    Tech Nation Michael Gazzaniga's 'Tales From Both Sides of the Brain' UC Santa Barbara professor Michael Gazzaniga tells us about both sides of our brains - in fact, there are many parts to our brains - not just a right hemisphere, and a left.
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media The Effects of Skewed Media Depictions of Cancer The latest cancer cures, fundraising campaigns and miraculous survival stories are ubiquitous in the news. But cancer coverage rarely reflects real-world cancer incidence rates. University of Utah health communication scholar Jake Jensen explains how skewed media depictions of cancer may impact what cancers get funded.
Sunday, March 29, 2015

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