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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, April 11, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The Buffet Rule and Electoral Politics President Obama has embraced billionaire investor Warren Buffett since 2008, and lately he has made use of Buffett's statement about paying a lower tax rate than his secretary pays. Now it's becoming part of the Obama re-election plan.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials World Affairs 2012 Navigating in a Shifting Global Landscape Shifting Political and Economic Landscapes: How Can the U.S. Adapt? -- This week, the program presents features from WorldAffairs 2012, the World Affairs Council's annual conference designed for global citizens seeking deeper insight, understanding and context surrounding critical issues of our day. In our collective memory, the U.S. has been the dominant global power. But now, other countries are taking advantage of the benefits of globalization and the increase of information technology to put themselves on the road to being the next world power. It doesn't help that the U.S. has been embroiled in recession, mounting debt, wars abroad and a toxic political climate. What path is America setting itself on? How can the U.S. adapt in the ever-changing political and economic landscapes? Michael Mandelbaum joins the program to share his thoughts on the subject. Mandelbaum is the director of the American Foreign Policy Program and a professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Beach Volleyball Gold Medalist Kerri Walsh Beach volleyball star Kerri Walsh is well on her way to qualifying for the summer Olympics. She's seeking her third-straight Olympic gold medal -- and this time she's sponsored by Pampers. What does that sponsorship mean for an athlete who is also a mother?
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Santorum Drops Out On Tuesday, Rick Santorum announced he will suspend his presidential campaign, clearing the way for frontrunner Mitt Romney's bid for the Republican nomination. But can Romney win over the social conservatives who rallied around Santorum? We find out what the news means for California's role in the GOP primary and the future of the presidential race.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum The Ugly Side of Beauty: Toxic Chemicals in Nail Polish Some nail polishes labeled "non-toxic" still contain high levels of dangerous chemicals, according to a new report by California's Department of Toxic Substances Control. The report raises questions about the reliability of cosmetics labeling. How can health-conscious consumers navigate the world of beauty products? And are the chemicals as harmful as some say?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum 'Taste What You're Missing' Author Barb Stuckey says if you really want to understand why you like the food you like, you can't stop with taste. Her new book "Taste What You're Missing" explains how all five senses interact to make our experience of meals delicious, or disappointing.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Political Junkie Santorum has called it quits, and even Newt says Mitt Romney is going to win -- but the former speaker will press on regardless. Political junkie Ken Rudin joins the show to discuss the return of "inevitability" and Romney's next challenge.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Whats in Our Food? We've heard a lot lately about "pink slime" and ground beef. Ryan Lynette looked closer at what's in his burger, and found another red flag. But food scientists say it's just fermented vegetable starch.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Carole King Terry Gross talks with singer and songwriter Carole King about her new memoir "A Natural Woman." It's about her years writing songs for others, and then becoming a performer and writing for herself. She also has a new album, "Carole King: The Legendary Demos." King's first hit song was "Will You Love Me Tomorrow," which she wrote with her songwriting partner Gerry Goffin, who became her husband. King's 1971 album "Tapestry" still holds the record for the longest time a solo female album remained on the charts.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Vietnam Looks West Authorities in Vietnam are looking west for economic opportunity, and there's a national campaign to teach English. The language is catching on, along with some western ideas which could undermine some of Vietnam's authoritarian traditions. The show finds out how some Vietnamese are embracing English, along with free speech, Steve Jobs and hip-hop.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Inside Foxconn Part I In the first of a two-part series, reporter Rob Schmitz goes inside a Chinese Foxconn factory and meets some of the workers behind your iPad.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm & 6pm


    Romney Embraces the Ryan Budget -- Mitt Romney has publicly embraced the budget plan proposed by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, a Wisconsin Republican and hero to many conservatives. Ryan endorsed Romney just days before the Wisconsin primary and campaigned with the former Massachusetts governor. As the program reports, Romney's embrace of the Ryan budget shows that Romney's trying to prove to conservatives that he's a bold, dynamic risk-taker.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Inside Foxconn Part I In the first of a two-part series, reporter Rob Schmitz goes inside a Chinese Foxconn factory and meets some of the workers behind your iPad.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Carole King Terry Gross talks with singer and songwriter Carole King about her new memoir "A Natural Woman." It's about her years writing songs for others, and then becoming a performer and writing for herself. She also has a new album, "Carole King: The Legendary Demos." King's first hit song was "Will You Love Me Tomorrow," which she wrote with her songwriting partner Gerry Goffin, who became her husband. King's 1971 album "Tapestry" still holds the record for the longest time a solo female album remained on the charts.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials World Affairs 2012 Navigating in a Shifting Global Landscape What's Next for Israel in the Turbulent Middle East? -- This week, the program presents features from WorldAffairs 2012, the World Affairs Council's annual conference designed for global citizens seeking deeper insight, understanding and context surrounding critical issues of our day. In this episode, the show looks at the current situation of Israel in the Middle East, vis-a-vis Syria, Iran and Palestine. What does Israel make of the fighting in Syria? Will Israel truly engage in a preemptive strike on Iran's nuclear facilities? Will Israel's peace treaty with Egypt be upheld? What is the state of Israeli-Palestinian relations given the Arab Spring and Palestine's statehood application to the U.N., and what are the implications on the 2012 U.S. elections? Martin Indyk, vice president and director of foreign policy at The Brookings Institution and former U.S. ambassador to Israel shares his thoughts with World Affairs Council President and CEO Jane Wales.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum 'Taste What You're Missing' Author Barb Stuckey says if you really want to understand why you like the food you like, you can't stop with taste. Her new book "Taste What You're Missing" explains how all five senses interact to make our experience of meals delicious, or disappointing.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered North Korea Nuclear Test? North Korean leaders have threatened to carry out a nuclear test if the U.S. and other nations take measures in response to its rocket launch. Another test by North Korea would likely be of a nuclear device using highly-enriched uranium, rather than the two plutonium bombs the north has exploded so far. North Korea could be eager to carry out another test no matter how the U.S. reacts.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered More Man-Made Quakes The latest numbers from geologists show a six-fold increase in small earthquakes in the mid-U.S. since 2009. The likely suspect isn't fracking, but the disposal of waste water from oil and gas wells into underground wells. Fracking has, however, increased the amount of water that has to be disposed of. Now, the U.S. Geological Survey and EPA are planning to do something about it by this summer.
Wednesday, April 11, 2012

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